Sometimes in the tea industry, we get wrapped up in our day to day and lose sight of the fact that we all work for the same industry.  On occasion, we all put aside that day to day and come together as a group to discuss the issues faced by tea and put our heads together to find solutions.  Today was such a day in Malawi.

I made the long trip to beautiful Malawi at the invitation of WUSC – World University Service of Canada.  They are a Canadian NGO whose work is focused on international development.  A series of workshops have been organized by WUSC in order to help facilitate a better understanding of the Canadian tea industry.  That means that over these few days, we are meeting with a series of participants within the tea industry in Malawi giving presentations and having discussions to help better understand our market.

Today was one of those meetings.  And for a moment this morning, when I walked into the conference room, I stopped and reflected on the fact that as fragmented as we sometimes are in this industry, there are times when we come together to help each other.  My audience today included smallholders (growers), Chairmen’s of the largest tea estates, buyers, brokers, as well as the Principal Secretary to the Ministry of Agriculture.  It doesn’t get more broad than that.

It was a good reminder however, I hope, for everyone that was in that room.  That no matter what part of the industry we stand, we are all working for the good of one thing…the tea leaf…and specifically today…tea in Malawi.  Because the reality is, that the issues of gender equality, youth employment, living wages can’t be solved by one sector alone.

 

 

Teagirl is on another adventure.  This time my journey takes me to far away Africa – specifically…Malawi.  A small landlocked country towards the south-eastern corner of Africa. Why Malawi, teagirl?  Because Tea is the second largest export for Malawi.  Because Malawi represents about 3% of the world’s tea production.  3% may not seem like much….but consider this, Japan, which most of you think of as being central to the specialty tea market, makes up a poriton of 1% of the entire world production.  That’s right, not even a whole percentage – a portion of 1%.  So yes, we need to pay attention to some of these countries not on our radar producing beautiful teas.

There are a number of reasons I am here.  And I hope you come on this journey with me.  Because it’s a journey not only in understanding the value of tea from Malawi – beyond what it is being used for now…largely blending.  But also in dissecting some of the challenges we face within the tea industry – empowering women, younger workers (18-34) and providing living wages for workers.

This journey started as all should, which is a taste of the beautiful country of which I am a guest for the next few days.  A rocky drive up to the Zomba plateau – witnessing the majestic beauty of a country relatively small compared to some of its neighbours.

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Malawi may not be rich by our modern measures of rich.  But it is rich in so many more ways.  It is rich in beauty.  It is rich in history.  And it is rich in the kindness of its people.  It was the pioneers within the great African continent to start with tea, but it has today, many challenges facing it.  Challenges, that many producing countries within the tea industry face.

Stay with me on this journey.  Discover some of the beautiful flavours produced out of Africa.  And I hope that along the way, together, we’ll try to muddle our way through the complexities that face this fragile labour market producing your beautiful cup of tea.